Women’s Reproductive Health and Rights: What You Should Know

Photo by Gayatri Malhotra on Unsplash

What Is Women’s Reproductive Health & Rights?

The right to make decisions about one’s reproductive health is still a fundamental issue for women. With the advancement of technology, there are many new options available for women to choose from when it comes to spacing out pregnancies, like birth control and sterilization.

5 Women’s Reproductive Health Myths

There are many myths that surround the topic of women’s reproductive health. The myths can lead to a lack of knowledge, which in turn leads to an inability to make informed decisions about their own bodies. In this article, we will explore 5 popular myths about women’s reproductive health and debunk them for you.

1) Myth: You can’t get pregnant if you have sex during your period

2) Myth: All birth control methods are the same

3) Myth: Birth control pills will make me gain weight

4) Myth: I can’t get pregnant if I’m breastfeeding

5) Myth: I need my periods to be regular

Photo by Hanna Balan on Unsplash

How Does Women’s Reproductive Rights Affect Me?

Women’s reproductive rights are a big issue in the United States and around the world. It is important to know how this issue affects you.

What does reproductive rights mean? Reproductive rights are the set of freedoms and entitlements that allow people to decide if, when, and how often to have children. Reproductive rights also include access to information about contraception, safe abortion services, and quality prenatal care.

How do women’s reproductive rights affect me? Women’s reproductive rights affect everyone because they deal with life-altering decisions that we all face at some point in our lives. They also give women more power over their bodies and futures which means they will have more control over their lives.

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Women’s Reproductive Health- What We Know Today

Women’s reproductive health is a very sensitive topic in today’s society. The way we talk about it, the way we think about it, and the way we address it are all changing.

In this article, I will cover what women know about their reproductive health today and what is happening to that knowledge.

Why All Women Should Care About Their Women Health- A Lesson from Margaret Sanger and Other Leaders for Female Empowerment

Photo by Rochelle Brown on Unsplash

Margaret Sanger was a birth control activist and founder of the American Birth Control League, now known as Planned Parenthood. Margaret Sanger’s contribution to the women’s health movement is undeniable and her legacy lives on today.

Margaret Sanger was born in 1879 in Corning, New York. She was raised by a strict Catholic family where she learned to be submissive and obedient to her father and brothers. Her mother died when she was twelve years old, which led her father to become more strict with her education. At age 16 she became pregnant with her first child who died as a result of miscarriage. This experience led Margaret to become more involved in the women’s rights movement..

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